Unreasonable Owners + Reasonable Board = Costs for Condo

A recent decision of the Superior Court of Justice illustrates how the conduct of the parties can sway a judge when it comes to the issue of costs. The case is York Condominium Corporation No. 922 v. Frank Lu et al (2016). The facts are straightforward. The owner refused to permit the condominium’s contractors to enter the unit to investigate it after a flood in the unit, which was caused by the owner’s tenants. The condominium made repeated attempts to gain access to the unit and offered to meet with the owner to discuss the issue, but the owner refused. The condominium engaged a lawyer, who wrote several letters, but the owner still refused to grant the condominium access to the unit.

The condominium started a court application under sections 92, 117, and 134 of the Condominium Act, 1998. The condominium asked the court for an order requiring the owner to allow it to access the unit to investigate the damage, and if necessary, repair the damage to the common elements.

The condominium was successful in its application and sought $15,416.00 in costs from the owner. Continue reading

Condo too aggressive; court awards no costs.

A condominium corporation commenced an application against unit owners seeking orders that they obey the rules, be quiet and leave others alone. The owner commenced a counter-application for the same relief against the condominium. Most of the dispute related to the costs of the proceedings. The condominium insisted upon full recovery, or near full recovery, of all of its costs (about $150,000.00) prior to a ruling by the judge. Neither the condominium or owners were successful in their applications. The condominium sought $30,000.00 in costs.

The ruling on costs is one of many made in the past few years where concerns were raised about a condominium’s aggressive stance toward an owner during a legal proceeding. This aggression seems to stem from the condominium’s confidence that it will be entitled to rely upon subsection 134(5) of the Act to recover all or almost all of its legal costs. Subsection 134(5) states: Continue reading