Draft Reg#2 – Part 3

feedback

The draft regulations also address issues like notices of meeting, voting, quorum, board meetings by electronic means, and voting thresholds for by-laws.

Notices of Meetings

The regulations set out the detail for the preliminary notice that must be sent to owners before an owners’ meeting. It details the type of information about candidates for director positions, candidates for auditors, and other material that owners want to be included (so long as 15% of the owners request it and it is not contrary to the Act or regulations). The preliminary notice will be a standardized form.

One thorny issue will continue to be requisition meetings. Since the amendments to the requisition process will not be included in the first phase of amendments, but the changes to the notice of meeting sections will be, it means that the board only has 5 days to send a preliminary notice of meeting after it receives the requisition. For example, if the requisition is received on January 10, the preliminary notice must be sent by January 14, the notice of meeting by January 29, and the meeting held on February 13. There would be no margin for error in sending out the notices or the meeting would be held beyond the period required by the Act (35 days from the receipt of the requisition).

It is intended that the regulations would come into force on July 1, 2017, but they would only apply to meetings held 40 days or more after the regulations come into force and for those where notice has not been sent.

Voting & Quorum

As you may know, quorum for meetings will be changed by the amendments to the Act. Quorum for owners meetings will be satisfied by: 1) 25% of the owners represented at the first and second attempts to hold the meeting; or 2) 15% of owners at subsequent attempts.

The regulations also require every condominium to have a standard provision in its by-law that no person voting by ballot, proxy, or electronic means, would be required to identify his name or the unit in which the vote is cast. There will be mandatory proxy forms for owners’ meetings instead of the optional forms used now.

In addition, there will be a lower threshold for voting for certain by-laws (i.e. to change the content for information certificates and notices, to add extra disclosure obligations for directors). Instead of a majority of all owners, the threshold would be lower: a majority of votes cast at the meeting.

These changes should be in force on July 1, 2017, but it would only apply to meetings held 40 days or more after the new quorum and voting sections of the Act come into force.

Draft Reg#2 – Part 2

feedback

 

The second draft regulation also describes the mandatory disclosure and training requirements for condominium directors. These changes came about because of perceived problems with widespread mismanagement, deceit, or fraud. Fortunately, these problems are less common than portrayed. Nonetheless, these changes should help protect condominium owners.

Mandatory Disclosures 

The disclosure requirements start even before a person becomes a director. Candidates must disclose certain information at the meeting where the election is taking place if they did not disclose it before in the candidates notice.  Continue reading

Reg#2 Released for Comment

feedbackAs you probably know by now, the government intends to release draft regulations to go along with the amendments to the Act. The purpose of releasing the draft regulations is to allow for public comment. The first draft regulation, which was released in December, addressed the mandatory licensing of managers.For the first draft regulation, the deadline for comments has passed.

The second draft regulation, which was released this week, is aimed at common condominium issues: communications from condominiums to owners and mortgagees; mandatory disclosures and training for directors; meetings and voting; and record retention and access to records. The government posted the full draft regulation and a reader-friendly version on its website. The deadline for public comments for the second draft regulation is March 30th, 2017. In the next few posts, I’ll describe some of the key features of the second draft regulation.

Continue reading

Changes are Coming – More Paperwork

paperwork.jpg

This post is geared towards the managers and self-managed boards out there. As you have probably heard by now, the amendments to the Act have been described as providing greater protection to owners. Only time will tell, but one thing that is clear: there will be a lot more paperwork!

Condominiums will be responsible for filing the following with the Registrar:

  1. Returns – initial return after registration; turn-over return; annual return; and other returns as may be prescribed.
  2. Notices of Change – in addition to filing notices of change of address, condominiums must also file notices of every change in directors.

Continue reading

Changes are Coming – Changes by Condo

change.jpgAs you may know, section 97 of the Condominium Act, 1998 (the “Act”) addresses changes made to the common elements, assets, and services of the condominium. In the amendments to the Act, section 97 will be removed and replaced with a new section 97.

What’s changing?

The awkward language “addition, alteration, or improvement” will be replaced with “modification” (although the three words will form part of the definition of modification). Section 97 will also add a requirement that the board must conduct an assessment of the cost of any proposed modification where it is required to give notice to the owners.

Apart from the language, there are some other big changes coming to section 97. Continue reading

Changes are Coming – Chargebacks

chargeback.jpgLast Friday I participated in the ACMO Burlington conference as a speaker on the legal panel. One of the topics that I briefly spoke about was chargebacks and liens. I spoke about the changes coming to the lien and chargeback processes in the Condominium Act, 1998 (the “Act”). Today I’m going to summarize my presentation for those who were not able to attend the conference.  Continue reading

What is a Section 98 Agreement?

stencil-default-5In my last post, I wrote about section 98 of the Condominium Act, 1998, which permits owners to make changes to the common elements if: the board approves the proposed change; they enter into an agreement with the corporation; and notice is provided to all owners (if applicable). Today I’ll discuss the agreement in more detail.

Section 98 of the Act requires an owner to enter into an agreement with the corporation before making any changes to the common elements. The agreement must, at a minimum, do the following:

  1. Allocate the cost of the proposed change between the owner and the corporation;
  2. Set out the responsibilities for maintenance, repair after damage, and insurance of the proposed change; and
  3. Set out other matters required by the regulations, which currently adds a requirement that the agreement state who owns the change.

The agreement may be referred to as a “section 98 agreement”, “indemnity agreement”, or “alteration agreement”. The term used is not important; it is simply a preference of the lawyers and managers in the area. For instance, in Waterloo and surrounding areas the term “indemnity agreement” is often used, whereas toward London the term “alteration agreement” is more common.

Continue reading