The Black Hole of Record Requests

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Many good managers and directors have been pulled into the black hole that is record requests under the amendments to the Act. Since November 1, 2017 there is a new process for requesting records and providing copies or access to them. Unfortunately, the new process is complicated and time-intensive, which will likely to lead to more disputes than the old process.

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Amending the Condo Documents

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Lately our firm has been working on a lot of revisions to condominium documents: the declaration, description, by-laws and rules. Cannabis has been a very popular topic these past few months. Some condominiums are updating their condominium documents to reflect changes to the Condominium Act, 1998. Others are making changes to the number of directors or their qualifications.

Many clients complain that the process to change their documents is confusing. The main reason for the confusion is that each type of document has its own process to change it. The purpose of this post is to describe the basic process to change each of the documents.

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Fight over 14% budget increase leads to court battle

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Most unit owners would be upset to receive notice that their monthly condo fees were increasing by almost 15% the following year. Recently an owner was surprised when she received notice from her condominium of a 0% change in her monthly fees.  She was expecting an increase close to 15%. Was she pleasantly surprised? Apparently not as she commenced an application in the Superior Court of Justice against the condominium and one of its five directors.  Continue reading

CAT rules on access to proxies

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The CAT (Condominium Authority Tribunal) has released another important decision on the right of owners to access records. Cangiano v. Metropolitan Toronto Condominium Corporation No. 962 is a dispute over the owner’s right to receive “legible and unaltered” copies of the proxies used at the AGM. The condominium refused to provide unaltered copies because the proxies contained personal information, but offered to provide redacted copies for $27.60. The owner sought an order directing the condominium to provide her with un-redacted copies of the proxies. Continue reading