The Condo’s Lien Right – When Does Default Occur?

bank.jpgRecently, the court released an interesting decision on cost awards against owners and the right to lien.The facts are lengthy, but it is important to understand the background.

The condominium brought a compliance proceeding against one of the owners. The condominium was successful. The judge made an endorsement that required the owner to pay $15,000.00 in costs within 30 days of the date of the endorsement. The condominium switched counsel and management companies shortly after the endorsement was made. Several months later the condominium added $44,000 to the unit owner’s ledger. The condominium’s lawyer then sent a letter to the owner demanding payment within 30 days.  The owners did not pay so the condominium’s lawyer sent a notice of lien in November 2011 and registered the lien in December 2011. The condominium served a statement of claim for possession and a default judgment was signed in April 2013. A notice of sale was sent in May that indicated $77,709 was owing. The condominium obtained possession of the unit in November 2013.

In December 2013, the owner stopped paying his mortgage. The lender, CIBC, began making demands for payment. CIBC obtained judgment on October 22, 2014, for $135,411 plus costs. For unexplained reasons, CIBC was not aware of the power of sale proceedings of the condominium and the fact that the condominium was set to sell the unit within a few days. The condominium and CIBC agreed to continue with the sale of the unit and hold the proceeds in trust until a court could determine the priority of the lien and mortgage.  Continue reading