Knowing the Signs…Election Times

When you think of an election what comes to mind? In my experience, an upcoming election means preparing for the barrage of campaign advertising, door-to-door canvassers, and social media posts from your relatives and friends that have questionable fact checking. A significant contributor to the visuals of an election are the seemingly inescapable candidate signs on tufts of grass by the local Starbucks or throughout your neighborhood. Condominiums share the unique complication of sharing a collective yard space that represents the building, tenants, and condo corporation, so management must be prepared to manage the political participation of their owners and residents while staying up to date with the current law. Continue reading

Condo Act Changes: A Primer for Real Estate Agents & Lawyers

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Those working in the condo industry often complain that real estate agents and lawyers do not adequately advise their clients before they purchase units in condominiums. With the substantial changes recently made to the Condominium Act, 1998 (the “Act”), and more to come in the following months, it is sure to be a complaint we continue to hear for the foreseeable future. Today, I thought that I would provide a few tips for real estate agents and lawyers acting for those looking to purchase a unit in a condominium.  Continue reading

Common Errors with the Amendments: Part 2

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While we all get a handle on the new forms and requirements (and wait for further amendments still to come), I thought I’d do an update on a post I did a few months ago about common mistakes or misconceptions. Here are some of the most common issues we’ve encountered so far:

Myth: The preliminary notice of meeting is only required for annual general meetings.

Truth: The preliminary notice of meeting is required for ALL owners meetings, including annual general meetings, requisition meetings, and special general meetings. The only time it is not required is where the meeting is called solely to fill vacancies on the board where a quorum has been lost.  For more information, see section 12.2(5) of O.Reg. 48/01.

Myth: There is one form for disclosure by candidates and directors.

Truth: There is no prescribed form for disclosures by candidates or directors. That said, many law firms and management companies have created disclosure forms. Be careful when using these forms. The disclosure obligations for candidates and directors are NOT the same so different forms should be used for candidates prior to election and directors after their election or appointment.

Myth: Nothing bad will happen if we don’t file our returns with the CAO or pay our $1/unit/month assessments.

Truth: There are a number of possible consequences for failing to file the returns or pay the assessments:

  • The CAO can levy late fees for not filing returns on time (see section 9.6 of the Act).
  • The Registrar of the CAO can also order a person to comply with the return and assessment requirements (see section 134.1 of the Act).
  • A corporation that has not paid its fees is incapable of maintaining a proceeding before the Tribunal or a court, except with leave of the court (see section 23.1 of the Act).
  • A person who fails to complete returns or pay assessments may be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of $25,000 for individuals and up to $50,000 for corporations!

Stay tuned for more common misconceptions and myths.

Soliciting Proxies: What’s Changed?

proxyI’ve had a few files recently where questions surfaced about the new restrictions on who can and can’t solicit proxies for owners’ meetings. When can a manager solicit a proxy? When can’t a manager solicit a proxy? It appears some people may be unaware of the changes to the rules governing the solicitation of proxies for owners’ meetings, especially by managers and others on their behalf.  Continue reading

Forms for Ongoing Disclosure by Directors

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A lot has been written about the obligation of candidates to disclose information and make certain statements prior to their election or appointment to the board of directors. The Act requires candidates to satisfy the disclosure obligations prior to their election to be qualified as directors (see section 29(1)(f) of the Act). Whether the disclosure may be made orally at the meeting or in writing depends upon a number of factors, including when the person notified the condominium of their intention to be a candidate and the condominium’s by-laws. There is no prescribed form for making the required statements in writing, but many law firms and management companies have created forms for candidates to complete prior to the election. The requirements for candidate disclosures are described in section 11.6 of O.Reg. 48/01.  Continue reading

Is it Time to Amalgamate?

stencil.default (33)There is just over a month to go until the amendments to the Condominium Act, 1998, come into force (unless the implementation is delayed again). The industry is abuzz about the amount of work the amendments are going to create with all of the returns, notices of change, certificates, disclosure obligations, etc. So you might be asking “Why would anyone want to create more work for themselves and amalgamate now?”

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Development: Unique Condo Uses

new developmentI’ve been working on a large number of condo developments in the past few weeks so I thought I’d take a few minutes to discuss some interesting uses for the condo concept.

Before the Act was amended in 1998 there was only one type of condominium – the standard condominium. It was used for residential, commercial, or mixed uses, or for high-rises, townhouses, and single-detached homes. The amendments created two main types: leasehold and freehold. Freehold has four subtypes: standard, phased, common elements, and vacant land. These new types added even greater flexibility to the condo concept allowing developers to get creative with their developments.

For those interested, I have a three-part article being published in CCI-London & Area’s newsletter if you want to learn more about the types of condominiums.

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