Can Unit Owners Examine Opinions or Invoices from the Condominium’s Lawyer?

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Owners are entitled to examine records of the condominium. Subsection 55(3) of the Condominium Act, 1998, gives owners the right to examine or obtain copies of the condominium’s records, subject to certain limits described in subsection 55(4). Subsection 55(4) excludes certain records, including records related to other owners or units and records “relating to actual or contemplated litigation”. These provisions are designed to balance the competing interests of the owners and protect the condominium’s interests. Continue reading

CAT Says Being Self-Managed is Not an Excuse

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In a recent decision the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT) was asked to rule on an owner’s request for records. The owner requested several records, including audited financial statements, budgets, board meeting minutes, AGM minutes, the most recent PIC, by-laws, employment agreements with any directors, and management contract. The condominium suggested that many of the issues raised by the owner were due to the condominium being self-managed. Spoiler: this was not a reasonable excuse for not providing records. Continue reading

Condo Ignores Condo Authority Tribunal (CAT) Requests to Join Case

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A recent CAT decision serves as a good reminder to condominiums of the consequences for refusing to participate in the process.

The owner requested various records from the condominium twice. The condominium had its lawyer respond indicating that it had no obligation to respond because the owner had not used the mandatory form. The lawyer provided a copy of the request form with the letter and indicated that they would respond to the request once it was submitted on the proper form. The owner completed the form and sent a copy via fax to the lawyer and manager. The condominium did not respond so the owner filed a case with the Condominium Authority Tribunal (the “CAT”).

The owner provided notice of the CAT case by courier to the condominium at the management office. The CAT clerk even contacted the condominium twice to ensure they received the notice. The condominium still did not join the case. The condominium did not participate at any point and the process continued without it.

There is an interesting discussion of records requested by the owner that related to a civil action commenced by the condominium against the builder and developer. The action was funded by a special assessment and eventually settled with a payment to the condominium of $1.7 million. The owner was concerned because there was apparently a discrepancy between the settlement amount and the amount received by the condominium ($700,000) so the owner sought an accounting of the amount as well as the settlement agreement. After reviewing sections 55 and 23 of the Act, the CAT member found the owner was entitled to see the settlement agreement.

The CAT ordered the condominium to provide all of the records requested by the owner and pay a penalty of $3,000 for its refusal to provide the records without reasonable excuse. The CAT also awarded the owner costs of $150 (the filing fees paid to the CAT by the owner).

While $3,000 is a significant penalty for many condominiums, I wonder if it is enough incentive for some of the larger condominiums with multi-million dollar budgets. Clearly some are still choosing to ignore record requests by owners (and apparently direct contact from the CAT clerk). What will it take to get them to respond? $10,000? Personal liability on the directors? A summons? Fortunately, most condominiums comply with their obligations when records are requested.

The full case is available on CanLii: https://www.canlii.org/en/on/oncat/doc/2019/2019oncat44/2019oncat44.pdf

Is the CAO responsible for creating the forms? Maybe in the near future…

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There is a new proposal to have the CAO assume responsibility for 19 forms under the Condominium Act, 1998 and its regulations. The idea is that the proposed changes would “support the condominium community in being able to more easily access and use certain forms under the Condominium Act, 1998.” The proposal is for 17 forms to be delegated to the CAO on January 1, 2020 and 2 additional forms on July 1, 2020. Continue reading

Summer Reading: Condo Authority Tribunal (CAT) Edition

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On April 11, 2019, I wrote about some of the Condo Authority Tribunal (CAT) decisions so far. Some of the highlights include the dismissal of claims that were vexatious, the adoption of the “open book” principle enumerated in previous case law, and confirmation that owners may access the list of owners. You can read the post here. The CAT has been busy since my previous post, releasing another 16 decisions in the last four months! Here are some of the highlights for these recent cases: Continue reading

Ready, Set, Action: Are In-Camera Minutes a Record of the Condo?

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Many condominiums have private sessions during board meetings where they discuss more sensitive issues involving unit owners, employees, or litigation. These are often referred to as “in-camera” sessions. Owners, apart from the directors and officers, would not be eligible to attend these portions of the meetings. Are owners entitled to access the minutes from in-camera sessions of the meetings of the board? A recent CAT decision answers the question. Continue reading

Are emails between directors a record of the condominium? The CAT says…

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Can owners request copies of emails between directors? Can the condominium refuse a record request because the owner’s reason for requesting the records is apparently unrelated to their ownership interests? Must the owner prove their reason is related to their ownership interest, or is the onus on the condominium to prove the reason is unrelated to the owner’s interests? These are only a few of the questions recently answered by the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT).

Kai Sin Yeung v. Metropolitan Toronto Condominium Coporation No. 1136 

An owner requested emails related to the renewal of a gas contract referenced in board meeting minutes. The owner wanted a penalty and costs of the hearing. The condominium claimed that the emails do not exist, but even if they existed the owner would not be entitled to them. Continue reading

CAT says no to owner’s request to see email addresses

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The CAT released a decision confirming that owners are not entitled to receive email addresses provided by owners and mortgagees to the corporation. The case includes an interesting review of the relevant provisions of the Act and regulations related to the record of owners and mortgages and the exceptions to the right to examine records. The full case can be found on CanLii: https://www.canlii.org/en/on/oncat/doc/2019/2019oncat9/2019oncat9.html?resultIndex=3

Some highlights include: Continue reading

Lessons from the CAT

legal caseOn April 5, 2019 I attended the ACMO / CCI 1-day Conference in Kitchener. I was asked to speak during the round table discussions and on the legal panel. My topic for the round table discussion was the Condominium Authority Tribunal (CAT). Today I thought that I would share some of the lessons that we have learned so far from the CAT’s first twenty or so decisions. Continue reading